The Pet Professional Guild Responds to the UK Government’s Decision to Ban Electronic Shock Collars in Pet Training, Care, Behavior Modification, and Management

Read full response The Pet Professional Guild Responds to the UK Government’s Decision to Ban Electronic Shock Collars in Pet Training, Care, Behavior Modification,and Management

Why can’t cats resist thinking inside the box?

The cats-in-boxes issue was put to the test by Dutch researchers who gave shelter cats boxes as retreats. According to the study, cats with boxes adapted to their new environment more quickly compared to a control group without boxes: The conclusion was that the cats with boxes were less stressed because they had a cardboard hidey-hole to hunker down in. Let this be a lesson to all cat people – cats need boxes or other vessels for environmental enrichment purposes. Hidey-holes in elevated locations are even better: Being high up provides security and a birds’s-eye view of the world, so to speak.

An Open Letter to Pet Industry Representatives Regarding the Use of Shock in Animal Training

Shocking pet dogs remains a common, if controversial, training practice worldwide. In this open letter, Pet Professional Guild (PPG) combines decades of research, the opinions of certified animal behaviorists, and the question of ethics to explain why using electric shock in the name of training and care is both ineffective and harmful. PPG concludes that shocking constitutes a form of abuse towards pets, and, given that there are highly effective, positive training alternatives, should no longer be a part of the current pet industry culture of accepted practices, tools or philosophies.

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How to Select a Dog Trainer Guide for Veterinarians

Information owners should obtain before choosing a dog trainer * It is advised that clients call and interview a trainer prior to hiring them. If the trainer you are considering using falls into any of these categories, you should pick another trainer. · If the equipment recommended for basic obedience includes or is focused on choke collars, prong collars, or shock collars. · Trainers who ban head collars of any kind may rely unduly on force. · If the trainer instructs you to manage your dog’s behaviors by pinching toes, kneeing the dog in the chest or abdomen, hitting the dog, forcibly holding the dog down against their will, constantly yelling at the dog, frequently yanking the collar constantly, or using prong, choke, pinch or shock collars or electronic stimulation. · If the trainer believes most or all training is about encouraging the person to be “alpha” and teaching the dog to “submit”.

Animal Behaviour and Welfare Course Completed

Joyce Deborah Kesling has successfully completed Animal Behaviour and Welfare, a non-credit course offered by The University of Edinburgh. This student met or exceeded minimum passing requirements set by the course instructor, and in recognition of their accomplishment, was issued a Verified Certificate on September 4th 2014. About this Course Course Title: Animal Behaviour and …

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