Good dog trainers: How to identify one and why this is important to your veterinary practice

The purpose of this brief article is to demonstrate the value of identifying “good dog trainers” and incorporating this knowledge into your veterinary practice. The following recommendations represent a consensus document compiled by the authors as one of the final projects in the Advanced Applied Clinical Behavioral Medicine course at the 2004 NAVC PGI. Many of the authors are now using these recommendations in their practices in ways that have increased their productivity and altered the way they now practice medicine.

Dominant dog or dog that just needs training?

This is a great example of an adult 3 year old M Vizsla correcting adolescent behavior from an 11 month old M Husky.  When the two dogs first met, Bars tried mounting Hunter from the side a couple of times.  Hunter corrected his behavior using the least amount of force.  Bars continued to challenge Hunter, …

Continue reading Dominant dog or dog that just needs training?

What is the difference between training and behavior problem solving

“Behavior modification exercises are NOT, repeat NOT, obedience exercises. At the very outset, clients should be disabused of the notion that this is fancy obedience.” Karen L. Overall, MA, VMD, PhD, ACVB, ABS Center for Neurobiology and Behavior, Psychiatry Department, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. In August 2006, the first Journal of Veterinary Behavior was published. This first publication included an article titled “Good trainers: How to identify one and why this is important to your practice of veterinary medicine.” The article emphasized why it is important to choose the right dog trainer emphasizing characteristics, training methods, tools and how punishment should be addressed. Understanding the differences when making your choice for training and behavior problem solving creates a win-win situation for you and your pet.