Training technique controversies, Specialist Dr. Gary Landsberg, DVM in the Spotlight

Specialist in the Spotlight: Training technique controversies Jul 21, 2010 By: Gary Landsberg, DVM, DACVB, DECVB-CAVETERINARY MEDICINE Featured specialist: Gary Landsberg, DVM, DACVB, DECVB-CA, North Toronto Animal Clinic, Thornhill, Ontario, CanadaHost: Philip (Pete) VanVranken, DVM, Dickman Road Veterinary Clinic, Battle Creek, Mich.Dr. Landsberg helps you identify trainers that use positive practices, not punishment, to teach desirable behaviors in pets. [vodpod id=Video.4223998&w=425&h=350&fv=affiliateSiteId%3D30809%26widgetId%3D113297%26width%3D420%26height%3D338%26autoPlay%3D0%26playOnLoad%3D0%26mediaType_mediaID%3Dvideo_1178802%26revision%3D2%26allowFullScreen%3Dtrue%26] Training technique controversies, Specialist Dr..., posted with vodpod

The Role of Integrated Compliance and Obedience Training – In preventing and treating behavior problems

The Role of Integrated Compliance and Obedience Training - In preventing and treating behavior problems The role of incorporating obedience training or “nonconfrontational compliance training” is commonly suggested in conjunction with treating dog aggression problems. One of the benefits, according to Tortora (1983) is dogs learn cooperative behavior provides safety. In addition, Clark and Boyer (1993), argue “…obedience training promotes a ‘feeling of security’ because “clear lines of communication and social boundaries” using reinforcement and deterrents effectively help establish better behavior. According to Blackshaw (1991), the use of obedience training produced a “…high success rate involving dominance and territorial aggression” using “proper restraint techniques” coupled with obedience training. Even researchers (Cameron, 1997:271) who “discount the preventative value” seem to agree, “…obedience training provides tools for owners to use in modifying pet behavior.” In addition, incorporating simple obedience skills such as sit and stay provide avenues for positive reinforcement facilitating “secondary control” over aggressive behavior (Voith, 1980 a; Uchida et al., 1997). In spite of the overwhelming support and apparent success, the incorporation of obedience and noncompliance training remains controversial. Even though literature suggests the “preventative value” of obedience training is unclear, many authors still insist obedience training does offer a preventative value (Lindsay, 2001). Scientists like Overall (1997) says, “…dogs require rules and need a rule-based social structure” allowing communication and cooperation between parties. Overall advocates a type of “compliance training” similar to Voith’s “nothing in life is free” and says her program “…provides a means for ‘preventing such problems and in treating all forms of behavior problems’ (Lindsay, 2001).

The ABC’s of Learning Applied in Dog Training

Behavior is the result of learning, comes under the influence of genetics, biology and physiological constraints, and is subject to one’s motivational state. The subject of this essay is to illustrate how understanding and manipulating antecedent stimuli affects training new behavior and modifying or changing existing behavior. The answer lies in the reinforcement history for any given behavior.

Choice Behavior

“Choice responding refers to the manner in which individuals allocate their time or responding among available response options” (Fisher & Mazur, 1997). Everyday life presents choices with many of us giving little thought to how those choices influences our present and future behavior. Understanding how those choices are derived may be important in solving behavior problems and training situations. A choice made between behavioral responses has been greatly influenced by previous reinforcement history and one’s personal preferences.

Cropping ears, docking tails, breed standards, and selective breeding…who’s really benefitting humans or dogs!

Cropping ears, docking tails, breed standards, and selective breeding…who’s really benefitting humans or dogs! This week Banfield, The Pet Hospital®, “leading veterinary practice known for its focus on preventive care and experienced-based medicine” has issued a proclamation they will no longer “sanction” cropping of ears and docking of tails. Excuse me if I do not get a warm fuzzy emotional charge like many who have opposed this practice!