Defining dog behavior problems

Typically, there are several ways to approach and define a problem dog behavior. First, a behavior consultant should have a clear understanding of what normal behavior patterns are for any particular species and that normal behavior may be expressed inappropriately depending on the environment. Second, the behavior consultant should consider a clients “…cultural and personal preferences and normative judgments” since they may impact the client’s “attitudes and expectations, scientific understanding, societal mores [customs] about animal behavior, and costs…associated with the dog’s behavior” (Lindsay, 2001).

Responsible Dog and Cat Training and Behavior Solutions located in Sarasota and Bradenton Florida

Responsible Dog and Cat is located in Sarasota and Bradenton Florida. Our services include dog training, dog day care, dog boarding, dog day training, dog board and train (limited). We use pet friendly training methods. Our services are designed to enhance the human-canine bond. If you want to learn how to train your dog using behavioral and preventative strategies, Contact Us to schedule your private dog behavior/assessment consultation..

Joyce Kesling is certified in dog and cat behavior through iaabc.org and professional dog trainer experienced with many breeds and types of dogs. Review my experience, training, certifications and professional memberships here.

Defining Canine Aggression

Defining Canine Aggression “The aggressor always had a purpose behind his attack; he wanted something to be done, some object to be surrendered by the defender.” ~Mahatma Gandhi Scott and Fuller described aggressive behavior as agonistic behavior that included “…patterns of barking, growling, biting, running away, or rolling on the back and yelping.” All these …

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Position Statement on the Use of Shock in Animal Training

It is Pet Professional Guild’s (PPG) view that electric shock in the guise of training constitutes a form of abuse towards pets, and, given that there are highly effective, positive training alternatives, should no longer be a part of the current pet industry culture of accepted practices, tools or philosophies. In this position statement, PPG will combine decades of research with the opinions of certified animal behaviorists, and highlight the question of ethics to explain why using electric shock in the name of training and care is both ineffective and harmful.

An Open Letter to Pet Industry Representatives Regarding the Use of Shock in Animal Training

Shocking pet dogs remains a common, if controversial, training practice worldwide. In this open letter, Pet Professional Guild (PPG) combines decades of research, the opinions of certified animal behaviorists, and the question of ethics to explain why using electric shock in the name of training and care is both ineffective and harmful. PPG concludes that shocking constitutes a form of abuse towards pets, and, given that there are highly effective, positive training alternatives, should no longer be a part of the current pet industry culture of accepted practices, tools or philosophies.